Tuesday, June 14, 2016

How Much Money Do You Save Driving the 2016 Toyota Innova?


Technology has gone a long way, improving cars in every aspect from design, comfort, safety, and efficiency. With the increased awareness of issues like global warming and the push to conserve natural resources, carmakers have begun improving their vehicles in the aspects of emissions and fuel efficiency.

In the Philippines, one of the best-selling segments is the Entry-Level MPV. Known in the previous decades as the Asian Utility Vehicle or AUVs, they’re the de facto choice of increasingly mobile Filipino families. It also serves as the backbone of the industry, providing transportation solutions to businesses and entrepreneurs.

With fuel efficiency records dating back to the early  2000s, here’s a small snapshot on how much the Innova has improved over the past 15 years, starting from its predecessor, the Revo. However, it’s worth noting that traffic conditions have substantially worsened in the past years.

2003 Toyota Revo 1.8 SR
Engine: 1.8 7K EFI 4-cylinder
Fuel: Gasoline
Maximum Output: 80 horsepower @ 4,600 rpm
Maximum Torque: 139 Nm @ 2,800 rpm
Transmission: 5-speed M/T
Average Fuel Economy: 6.61 km/L (city, as tested)

2005 Toyota Innova 2.5 G
Engine: 2.5 2KD-FTV 4-cylinder
Fuel: Diesel
Maximum Output: 102 horsepower @ 3,600 rpm
Maximum Torque: 260 Nm @ 1,600-2,400 rpm
Transmission: 4-speed A/T
Average Fuel Economy: 11.28 km/L (mixed, as tested)

2007 Toyota Innova 2.0 G
Engine: 2.0 1TR-FE 4-cylinder
Fuel: Gasoline
Maximum Output: 136 horsepower @ 5,600 rpm
Maximum Torque: 182 Nm @ 4,000 rpm
Transmission: 4-speed A/T
Average Fuel Economy: 8.12 km/L (city, as tested)

2014 Toyota Innova 2.5 V
Engine: 2.5 2KD-FTV 4-cylinder
Fuel: Diesel
Maximum Output: 102 horsepower @ 3,600 rpm
Maximum Torque: 260 Nm @ 1,600-2,400 rpm
Transmission: 4-speed A/T
Average Fuel Economy: 9.09 km/L (city, as tested)

2016 Toyota Innova 2.8 V
Engine: 2.8 1GD-FTV 4-cylinder
Fuel: Diesel
Maximum Output: 171 horsepower @ 3,600 rpm
Maximum Torque: 360 Nm @ 1,200-3,400 rpm
Transmission: 6-speed A/T
Average Fuel Economy:  9.09 km/L (city, as tested), 13.33 km/L (mixed, as tested)

2KD-FTV in the 2014 Toyota Innova 2.5 V
Looking at the figures, the first-generation Innova saw a huge jump in power and efficiency over the Revo.

The Innova, equipped with a larger 2.0-liter gasoline engine and a 4-speed automatic, did 18.5 percent better than the Revo with a 1.8-liter motor and 5-speed manual. It’s worth noting that the Revo is down some 56 horses and 121 Nm of torque to the Innova.

During the same period, the Department of Energy (DOE) revealed that the Revo 2.4 diesel 5 M/T achieved 16.50 km/L in a fuel efficiency run done in 2002. It was beaten six years later by the Innova 2.5 5 M/T with 18.41 km/L or a 10.35 percent improvement during another DOE sanctioned fuel eco run.

1GD-FTV in the 2016 Toyota Innova 2.8 V
Moving to the first and second generation Innova this time, it’s clear that fuel efficiency remained the same in the urban setting when both are equipped with a diesel engine and an automatic gearbox. Of course, the new Innova wins big with 69 more horsepower and 100 Nm more of torque.

While fuel efficiency in the city remained the same, the new Innova scored a big win in the mixed urban/highway setting where the new drivetrain enabled the 2.8 V to gain an additional 15.37 percent compared to the previous 2.5 V. This figure approaches the levels achieved by the Revo and first-generation Innova in a fuel eco run setting!

It’s also worth saying that in a pure highway setting, the 2016 Innova did 19.61 km/L—the best ever for Toyota’s MPV. This figure was reiterated by the latest DOE Euro 4 fuel economy run where it did 25.25 km/L.

Now what does all this mean for you? More savings and less trips to the pump, of course.

Focusing on mixed city/highway usage, the first-generation Innova dries its tank at 620.4 kilometers while the new one does it in 733.1 kilometers. That additional distance traveled is more than enough for an additional one-way trip from Manila to Clark.

In peso sense, pegging diesel at P 27.90, the first-generation Innova runs at P 2.47 per kilometers while the new one does it at just P 2.09—that’s a saving of P 0.38 per kilometer. Running 20,000 kilometers annually, that’s a savings of P 7,600!

In short, when Toyota opted to give the all-new Innova a larger 2.8-liter motor as opposed to  a 2.4-liter one, they were doing their homework. Not only is the new 1GD-FTV more powerful than ever before, it is also more fuel efficient. Do take note that the figures above are based on personal records kept since 2003 mixed with some figures from the DOE. As always, fuel efficiency is affected by a lot of factors such as driving conditions, traffic, etc.

35 comments:

  1. this reeks of paid journalism

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  2. Uly, you forgot to consider that the vehicles are priced differently... and that the fuel prices at the time the vehicles were new are different (cheaper for early '00s, expensive late '00s and early '10s. and that most people with MPVs don't travel 20k kms annually. maybe just about 10k.

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    1. Actually I asked for typical PMS costs for the old Innova and the new one. I want to see more or less the running cost more realistically. I'm still waiting. LOL

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    2. publishing an incomplete work? tsk tsk

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    3. LOL. It's not incomplete. It's a change of angle.

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  3. is it just me or are there a lot of grammatical errors in this article?

    anyway nice article. and you can't really compare between gasoline and diesel as they're completely different... gas to gas or diesel to diesel is fine but not gas vs diesel or vice versa

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    1. Are there? Sorry... Was half asleep when I was doing this.

      I didn't compare gas to diesel and diesel to gas. The comparison is strictly between gas to gas and diesel to diesel.

      I focused in on diesel because I had more seat time driving the diesels. The gasoline variants were only compared once.

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  4. Why not use the diesel version of the old Revo rather than the gas one. The 2L Engine of the DL variant is for me the better workhorse than the 1.8 gas engine.

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    1. imo diesels are generally better workhorses than gas. not sure about the revo though as i've never personally experienced them

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    2. Agreed. But never got to personally test the 2.4 diesel before. It was only run in a DOE fuel economy run before

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    3. ^Diesels are better workhorse than gas in terms of efficiency but not in terms of the environment! A Diesel powered vehicle should be taxed more when registered particularly those Crosswinds!

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  5. Nice article$$$. Lol!

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    1. I thought it was just worth comparing. I do wonder if I'll get free lunch LOL

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    2. A man once said,"If you're good at something, never do it for free".

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    3. ^Uly, getting a free lunch from Toyota is like getting a good quality PM service from Ford PH...

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    4. The man who said "If you're good at something, never do it for free" must have been the same guy who created the upper class.

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    5. ^I think he created "Mastercard"...

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    6. 06/15/ 11:00AM: Is Ford service that bad? Because I don't lunch LOL

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    7. Might be one of those typical corporate douchebags. If I'm good at something, I'd do it regardless of whether it's free or not. Kung walang bayad ok, kung meron eh di mas ok.

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    8. @AnonymousJune 15, 2016 at 11:14 AM
      if you're doing it out of the goodness of your heart, dapat kahit may reward di mo kukunin.

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    9. ^Uly, I think it would be nice to give a no-non-sense review of the efficiency and quality of after-sales services being offered by car companies in PH (provincial outlets)... start with Ford and maybe you'll get a "flowery" lunch from them so you can publish a "flowery" review!

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    10. wasn't the guy who said "if you're good at something, never do it for free" currently in jail...since batman was able to defeat him. but he did rob a bank, kill mobsters and incur terror upon the citizens.

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  6. The new Innova doesn't look good. It's like the designers fell asleep then hurriedly made up for lost time by simply adding fangs at the back. It's expensive, too. They justified that by saying the engine is 2.8L not seeing the irony of a much heavier Fortuner having a 2.4L version. Something is skewed here. If it's because there's not enough of the 2.4L engines in production, shouldn't they put what is available to good use by matching it with the Innova? Those Japs probably had too much saki.
    It's been months now since it was launched. I have yet to see a new Innova running in the streets. Damned saki.

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    1. do you mean its an MPV trying hard to look like an aggressive SUV/crossover?

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    2. The Japanese drink sake. The Saki is a kind of monkey.

      No new Innovas on the streets? Where do you friggin live?
      I see them everyday here in Metro Manila. My daily drive takes me through 3 cities though (QC-Pasig-Taguig).

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    3. ^Maybe implying the designers to be damned monkeys?

      Just saw one in person, colored like moss... side view, the body looks bulky... maybe due to the small wheels...

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    4. I agree-- the tires look a tad disproportionately small. And those tire wells don't look like they can take larger wheels.

      Oh well, it's an MPV.

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    5. Why in the hell do you people expect the innova to look good?!?! It's a f***ing MPV! It's built to embarass you for the sake of carrying extra people and cargo. MPVs are supposed to make you look like a loser/virgin. If you want to have a good looking car and get laid, look elsewhere.

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    6. Wow the "get laid dude" is back and he's here in a MPV article AGAIN, hahaha...

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  7. very nice comparison sir uly. I really appreciate it. at least we know that difference is minimal at less than 40,000 pesos per 100,000 kms. Better buy a good second hand unit.

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  8. after more than 1000km driving the diesel E mt variant i find the 2.8 displacement just right, its a relaxed engine,quiet even at more than max highway speed. with spirited driving and 8 passengers on board, my mix city highway ave is 13-14 km/li on normal mode. the fuel efficiency doubles at pure highway not exceeding 140 kph maintaining the eco green light. switching to power mode propels the vehicle twice the speed at half the throttle, its not for the faint of heart, still mix city hwy ave 10 to 11 km/li. if this is sold cheap and becomes the choice of fleet operators, its bound for abuse and racing by undisciplined taxi drivers given its fast acceleration, strong brakes, solid built and fuel efficient engine even on full load. at the price of this variant, just add a few thousands more if the higher stance, off road features and status of an entry level suv is your priority. do not buy this vehicle and let me savor its rarity.

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    1. ^You buy an innova and hope it be a rare sight on PH roads? Weird!
      Your appear to be defensive of buying that innova... so many praises... a psychological conditioning that you made the right choice of vehicle but deep inside craves for another...

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    2. How can he crave another? There's nothing else in the MPV category that even comes close to the Innova.

      Too many mind-readers or wanna-be psychologists posting on the forums.

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  9. A 2.5l engine is by common sense supposed to be more fuel-efficient than a bigger 2.8l engine. Hard to believe that the latter posted the same consumption as the 2.5l.

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