Saturday, April 8, 2017

CTEK CT5 START/STOP is a Must for Vehicles Equipped with Idle Start/Stop Tech


More than ever, the increasingly complex electronics in modern vehicles be it cars, SUVs, or light commercial vehicles, has put more pressure on the charging system. The humble lead-acid battery also known as the SLI (Starting, Lighting, Ignition) battery is now increasingly in the forefront and keeping it in good shape is tantamount to a worry-free, hassle-free motoring experience.

Having made a name for itself through OEM tie-ups with manufacturers such as Ferrari, Porsche, and Mercedes-Benz, CTEK is answering the call to make sure that your car’s 12-volt battery runs longer and more reliably. Today, CTEK is making available the CT5 START/STOP smart battery charger in the Philippines. This is the smart battery charger that’s especially made for vehicles equipped with idle start/stop systems.

With tightening emission regulations, especially in Europe looming near, the idle start/stop system has become the carmaker’s go-to solution to reduce emissions, especially in urban environments. It’s been so widely accepted there that in the next few years, idle start/stop technology will be mandated and cannot be switched off.

Though applauded for reducing emissions, idle start/stop is also punishing on a car’s electrical system, particularly on the battery. Even if equipped with EFB (Enhanced Flooded Battery) or deep cycle batteries, which as its name implies, can be deeply discharged using most of its capacity, they rarely last more than two years. In heavy stop-and-go traffic situations such as those in the Philippines, they can wear out much faster—sometimes in as little as 6 months.

Moreover, the importance of maintaining an EFB battery cannot be stressed further since it’s the sole power source of the vehicle’s electrical devices be it the air conditioning, audio system, or the navigation system. It’s also the one responsible for quickly re-starting the engine when the clutch is engaged or the brake pedal is released.

Addressing the unique need of owners of vehicles equipped with idle start/stop systems, CTEK is introducing the CT5 START/STOP. Like its best-selling MXS 5.0, which has an 8-step charging process, the CTEK CT5 START/STOP delivers a charge rate of 5 amperes per hour, enough for most cars and SUVs. Unlike the MXS 5.0 though, it delivers a higher voltage of charge required by deep cycle or EFB batteries. And making it more accessible to even the most novice of car owners, it doesn’t have a mode button. It simply plugs in and it’s ready to go. Indicator lights tell you when it’s charging and when it’s finished. Built-in checks also prevent against polarity reversal or if it isn’t connected properly. And since it is IP65 certified, it’s dust proof and splash proof making it perfect for garage use.

Though most owners will probably use the provided alligator clamps, the CT5 START/STOP, like other CTEK battery chargers, comes with the Comfort Connect. Recipient of Popular Mechanics Magazine product of the year award, the CTEK Comfort Connect gives owners the ability to charge quickly without worrying about clamping into the battery terminals each and every time. Just mount the Comfort Connect once and the battery can be quickly charged. It’s also perfect for batteries located in hard to reach areas such as in the trunk.

Robert Briggs, CTEK’s Director of Sales and Marketing in Asia-Pacific says that owners of CT5 START/STOP report satisfactory results. Topping up their batteries once every two weeks, these cars, equipped with EFB batteries report that their battery life has effectively doubled (and they are still going strong). And with EFB batteries not exactly cheap, this makes the CT5 START/STOP a worthwhile investment.

The CTEK CT5 START/STOP is exclusively distributed in the Philippines by Waido Marketing Corporation. For more information about CTEK, check out their Facebook page.

19 comments:

  1. I want to try this in my Mazda 3.

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    Replies
    1. Yes. It will likely save you from having to buy a battery every 6 months.

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    2. Every 6 months? Mazda 3 2.0 owners told me that their battery lasts from 18 months to 2 years.

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    3. The "every 6 months" is based on anecdotal experience of one particular user based in Bangkok. Still, with CTEK, the battery can last indefinitely (until it really cannot accept a charge).

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    4. I heard reports of Mazda 6 owners wherein their batteries died after 6 months of use, while Mazda 3 owners stated that their batteries lasts 18 months to 2 years. Perhaps its due to their usage? Mine is 4 months and still no problem, I use istop all the time in city driving. I'm really interested with the CTEK though, to prolong the battery's lifespan.

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    5. It will.

      It won't cost as much as a start / stop battery, so if you get to prolong the life by double, the investment you've made on the CTEK has been made worth it.

      My original battery lasted 5 years before I needed to replace it. And I had to replace it not because it had charging issues, but because the battery case started leaking.

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    6. I'm sold! You are the perfect endorser hehehe. Sir Uly, just to clarify your statement above, your battery lasted 5 years with the aid of CTEK by charging the battery religious (every 2 weeks)? Also this 5 yr old battery is not a deep cycle battery that's on a start/stop equipped vehicle? thanks!

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    7. My battery isn't a deep cycle battery, but according to Robert Briggs of CTEK, whether it's a traditional SLI battery or EFB (deep cycle) battery, as long as it's conditioned regularly, it will last longer. He has clients that have been running their battery for 14 years with no problem.

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  2. I own a Mazda 6 Skyactiv and I've already replaced the battery 3 times in the 2.5 years I've owned it. I'm on my 4th battery now, and I've always wondered if I was the only one experiencing this absurd battery drain. It seems I'm not the only one.

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    Replies
    1. Did you buy the local battery? It seems the local battery don't last long at all. The Japanese battery lasts two years without any problem but the cheaper local is prone to draining. Sometimes it drains after a few months of use

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    2. The first battery (OEM) which came with the car lasted about 10 months. It was replaced with Motolite, under warranty, and lasted about 8 months. The third one, I had to buy, which is another Motolite and lasted for about 10 months, it was replaced under warranty. The current one, is 3 months old now, I want to prevent the same thing happening all over again.

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  3. Just goes to show that whatever amount of fuel you save from the istop system will go down the drain since you have to buy these device just to make your battery life a bit longer than the usual (6 months). Add to that the frequent battery change evn with these device as compared to other car makes. And oh boy, be ready for expensive repairs/replacement once the istop system bogs down.

    For now, vehicles with throttle altering fuel saving systems seems to be the better choice in terms of maintenance.

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    Replies
    1. As I mentioned in the story, idle start stop is the future. Europe, for example, will be mandating them and it cannot be switched off in the next few years. It will only be a matter of time before all cars will have them and you won't be able to turn them off. For now, these technologies are expensive, but products like CTEK can make it more affordable in the long run.

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    2. I thought hybrid and electric vehicles were the future? Maybe they need it in europe and the americas where it can save fuel in their large engined cars but it doesn't make sense here where cars rarely go over 2.0 liters. Even with 2 liter cars, the savings are minimal to justify its cost

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    3. Yes, but diesel and hybrid technology is expensive.

      Idle start stop also reduces tail pipe emissions because the engine shuts off in traffic.

      The Picanto, with its 1.0 NA engine will have it as standard in Europe. Ford is also putting it in their new EcoSport and Fiesta as well. So is Subaru with their Impreza.

      The point is, start stop tech is the cheapest way to improve both economy and tailpipe emissions and we might have to brace for the fact that it will come in more models as standard equipment.

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  4. Hi Uly,

    Is there any tangible benefit to the CT5? I already have a MXS 5.0 since i use it for other cars also.

    Thanks

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    Replies
    1. The MXS 5.0 can also be used on cars with start stop tech. Charging and conditioning may take longer, but that's about it.

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    2. Sweet, thank you!

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  5. about istop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k159M8QhCIE

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