Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Hyundai's GDI: Finally Coming to the Philippines


Thank you Philippine government: that’s one line you don’t hear often with all the complaints about traffic and the lack of road infrastructure development. However, you also have to applaud them for finally implementing the Euro-4 emissions level this year and you know what that means? More car choices.

Mentioned as a single line in Hyundai Asia Resources, Inc. (HARI)’s Manila International Auto Show (MIAS) invitation, the Philippines is finally going to see Hyundai’s GDI or Gasoline Direct Injection technology. For some time, HARI has studied bringing in cars equipped with GDI but has always mentioned the then Euro-2 standard as the only reason why they couldn’t. Now that that reason is moot, it could mean the likes of the Sonata Turbo and Veloster entering HARI showrooms. (HARI just confirmed, the Veloster will be displayed at their stand).

As a short primer to GDI technology, it’s a fuel delivery system designed for improved fuel efficiency and lower emissions. Like its name suggests, it has a shorter, more direct path of fuel delivery while allowing for greater control of the fuel mixture at the optimum moment improving efficiency. The fuel is injected by a high-pressure pump at operates at up to 2,175 PSI. Hyundai engines equipped with GDI also use a higher than normal compression ratio for increased power while “dished” pistons are present to increase combustion efficiency.

Critics will say that the Veloster (if ever it’ll be part of HARI’s GDI line-up) is a bit late entering the party, but hey, you can’t deny that it’ll make for a sweet addition to Hyundai’s line-up. That and anything with “turbo” attached to its name.

Apart from introducing GDI technology, HARI is also displaying their newest commercial vehicles at the show.

The Manila International Auto Show (MIAS) runs from April 7 to 10 at the World Trade Center.

11 comments:

  1. This.

    GDI's suck. Bigtime. No car companies (well except toyota) has ever solved that dreaded intake valve gunk deposit issues as yet, associated with GDI engines. Some as early as 60k kms and the issues shows up. Like a sour thumb sticking up. No replacement for the ever reliable MPIs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a new revenue stream for the casas but it's the way forward, emissions-wise. Unlike here emissions regulations in Europe (Euro6 vs Euro4) are forcing manufacturers to standardize higher-maintenance, but more efficient technologies at the consumer's expense.

      Delete
  2. http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2015/01/is-carbon-buildup-a-problem-with-direct-injection-engines-.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  6. ^Hyundai two-door cars looks like a "trying-hard" European sports car...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi what seems to be the fuss with some car companies refusing to release certain engine models on account of fuel concerns? Lamborghini, Ferrari, Porsche and BMW - their M3 and M5, top models have been going around town using local and ordinary fuel. What makes hyundai engines so special?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The 1.0 Fiesta is also GDI and has been out for a few years already. Maybe Hyundai GDI specifically needs Euro4 fuels?

      Delete