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September 17, 2023

5 Electric Vehicle Myths Debunked


In recent years, electric vehicles (EVs) have emerged as a sustainable and environmentally friendly alternative to traditional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. However, they have also faced their fair share of skepticism and negative publicity. Rommel Juan, Chairman of the Electric Vehicle Association of the Philippines (EVAP), has been a staunch advocate for EVs and is committed to debunking these myths.

Myth 1: EVs Run on Fossil Fuels

One of the most persistent myths about EVs is that they simply shift the environmental burden from the tailpipe to the power plant. Critics argue that since most electricity is generated from fossil fuels, EVs are not a genuinely green choice. However, the EVAP Chairman who frequently encounters these questions about EVs, points out a key fact: in the Philippines, the Renewable Energy Law mandates that up to 25 percent of all electricity produced must come from renewable sources such as solar, geothermal, wind, biomass, and more. This ensures that a significant portion of the energy powering EVs in the country is clean and sustainable.

Even in regions where electricity generation relies heavily on fossil fuels, EVs are still more efficient than their ICE counterparts. Internal combustion engines are at their peak efficiency at lower RPMs, typically below 3,000. In contrast, EVs are efficient throughout their usage, making them a far more eco-conscious choice.

Myth 2: EVs Are Vulnerable to Flooding

Concerns about EVs being rendered inoperable during floods are common, especially in flood-prone areas like Manila. However, Juan, always striving to educate everyone about the benefits of electric vehicles, dismisses this notion by highlighting the Ingress Protection (IP) ratings of EV motors. The average IP rating for an EV motor is IP67, with IP68 being the highest achievable rating. An IP67-rated component can endure submersion in up to a meter of water for 30 minutes without sustaining damage. This level of water resistance ensures that flooding is not a significant threat to EVs, making them a practical choice in regions with heavy rainfall.

Myth 3: EVs Are More Prone to Fires

A common misconception that often circulates is the belief that electric vehicles (EVs) are more likely to catch fire compared to traditional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. However, Rommel Juan clarifies, “There is no proof or any study that suggests EVs catch fire more frequently than conventional ICE vehicles. What we often see is that when an EV does catch fire, it tends to make headlines more frequently than ICE vehicle fires.” This emphasis on isolated incidents can create a misleading perception that EVs are less safe when, in fact, their safety records are on par with or even superior to their ICE counterparts.

Myth 4: EVs Will Overload the Power Grid

Another misconception that frequently circulates is the fear that the widespread adoption of electric vehicles will collapse the Philippine power grid. However, Rommel Juan is quick to debunk this notion, stating, “The Department of Energy (DOE) has crafted charging strategies that can prevent overloading and even support grid reliability. EVs can be charged during off-peak hours, reducing the strain on the grid. Additionally, the concept of vehicle-to-grid technology allows EVs to act as a power source that can even push energy back into the grid when needed.” This innovative approach ensures that the power grid remains stable even with a growing number of EVs on the road.

Myth 5: Lack of Charging Infrastructure

Another common concern is that there are not enough charging stations for EVs. However, this is far from the truth. Rommel Juan points out, “Electric vehicles can be plugged into the same type of outlet as your electric fan. And in fact, there are more and more charging stations being set up by various EVAP members every day.” The increasing availability of charging infrastructure across the Philippines ensures that EV owners have convenient access to charging facilities.

Myth 6: Insufficient Range

Lastly, some skeptics claim that EVs do not have enough range to handle the daily travel demands of Filipinos. Juan addresses this concern, stating, “Electric vehicle range is more than enough for typical daily use in the Philippines. Most models offer a range of over 300 to 400 kilometers, while the typical Filipino daily drive is approximately 40 kilometers.” This means that the range of EVs comfortably covers the average daily commute, dispelling any worries about insufficient mileage.

Dr. Manny Biona, EVAP Executive Director, adds valuable insight to this myth and says that China, a major player in the EV market, set a minimum range requirement of 400 kilometers for EVs to qualify for subsidies. This strategic move by China significantly contributed to pushing up the range of EVs globally, ensuring that consumers have ample range for their daily travel needs.

EVAP, is a dedicated advocate for electric vehicles and is determined to dispel the myths and misconceptions surrounding them. With well-crafted government strategies, a growing network of charging infrastructure, and ample range to meet daily travel needs, electric vehicles are not just a sustainable option but also a practical and reliable choice for Filipino consumers.

26 comments:

  1. Ever since EVIDA, not one EV has lowered their SRPs even though they now enjoy tax perks. Corporate greed?

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    1. I think the nissan leaf is now priced at P2m.

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    2. Hongqi E-QM5 is priced at 1.7 Million Pesos only
      Cheapest EV sedan in the market
      Jetour QQ Ice Cream EV is at 700k

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    3. The problem is those are chinese cars. WHo would wanna buy them?

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  2. How about the super expensive battery that needs replacement evenrually?

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    1. This is what the marketing professionals are downplaying when they make their sales pitch. If you did bring up the topic, they will say don't worry price of battery will go down by the time they need replacing. But if you look at the trend in similar lithium ion batteries in phones over the years, the capacity may have gone up the price has not gone down and that will be true in the future.

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    2. In the future Mas magmahal nga batteries kaSi mas maraming car manufacturer ang gagawa ng EV's mag aagawan sa minerals supplies

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  3. Now that there has been some standardization on the type of charging nozzles , when will those Chinese and Japanese EVs comply. Usage of adapters are slowly being discouraged by charging stations like Shell.

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  4. Fact: it takes more fossil fuel to produce EV baterries.
    Also, you cant recycle EV batteries, they will be a heap of junk in the future.
    And they consume tons of energy from the power grid,
    Which in turn eats up more fossil fuel.
    In short, EVs are crap.

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  5. Environmental damage on mining and processing of those minerals for batteries. Hydrogen and solar could be the future of mobility.

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  6. EVs are not carbon neutral, from production, to everyday use, to end of life. It's the biggest scam perpetrated on green hippies. Same with fake meat for vegans. Heck, even commuting isn't carbon neutral.

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  7. Funny how they so called "dubunked" range anxiety/lack of charging infrastructure as if you can stop anywhere with household outlet and have your EV charged.

    EVAP should instead advocate for the mainstream brands to pass the 100% tax benefits to the consumers to compensate EV owners for early adoption and the cons of owning an EV.

    Until then, only those people that can afford to own a 2nd/3rd/ or a toy car will buy an EV.

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    Replies
    1. Yun na nga eh. Parang naman napakadaling makisaksak sa outlet ng iba. Tapos makikita pa nilang sasakyan ang isasaksak mo, baka nga hindi ka pa pasaksakin eh. Masyadong pinagbasehan ang kabaitan o kaunawaan ng iba, imbes na sa imprastrukturang pwedeng gamitin ng kalahatan. Propesyonal ba talaga ang nasa likod ng organisasyon na yan.

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    2. 12 hours ata charging if sa household outlet

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  8. The thruth is EVAP is already 11 years and has almost contribute nothing to ph EV industry.

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  9. EV adaption is very slow because car manufacturers only sell the high end ones. Is it not possible to build an EV with simple tech only so it will be priced around 1.5M which is attainable by many? Referring to japanese and korean cars only.

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  10. "25%"
    "Majority"

    Pick one.

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  11. I call BS on myth 1, and it wasnt debunked in any way either. Actually, more and more articles (based on studies i hope) are popping out about how environmentally devastating ev batteries (and solar panels) are, from production to its usage (theres an article here in carguide about how evs are less efficient than ice and hybrids). They are also future junk, at least solar panels are, to my knowledge.

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  12. Aside from #4, evap just confirmed that the myths are really true. EVAP should enumerate here what they have done for ph EV industry in 11 years of dear existence so that we can judge if its were just myths or true😁😁😁

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    Replies
    1. EVAP might as well go all the way and evaporate...

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  13. Even in US they need to upgrade their grid as 30% of additional demand is expected with the increase in EV usage. Producing EV batteries is affecting the environment and depleting our natural resources. I'll go for Toyota's direction in improving hydrogen fuel cell as an option for renewable form of transportation.

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  14. We can debate which is right or wrong , good or bad, basta 5 years lang ang excemption sa coding, tax exemption and others ang BEV cars time is ticking. Buy now or loose the benefits especially for MM people. Analysis equals to paralysis.

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  15. The best option for now is to just buy a hybrid and wait for EV price to become affordable and for ph EV infra to become more accesible

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  16. I'll go for full hybrid not the mild hybrid gimmick that consumes more or less the same as a conventional engine. Maybe in a couple of years when the infrastructure is ready and bev prices are competitive enough majority will shift.

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  17. Good work EVAP
    Don't mind the Toyota fans who are afraid of EVs
    Don't mind the Japanese car fans who hates Chinese and European EVs!

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