Tuesday, October 23, 2018

LTO Just Doubled Down on the Modified Car Ban


After a dialogue between off-roading groups, aftermarket industry players, and the LTO, we have some bad news to report for all you modders out there: the government agency isn’t issuing a moratorium on the apprehension of modified vehicles.

This was revealed by Atty. Robby Consunji who was at least seeking a temporary suspension of the LTO’s drive against modified vehicles while the parties involved could come up with a more technical framework for the law’s implementation.

However, it seems that the LTO is doubling down on its stance regarding the Department of Transportation’s Department Order 2010-32 which prohibits the certain vehicle modifications such as axle modification, chassis modification, and even change of rim size.

In fact, Atty. Consunji said that during their dialogue with the LTO, the LTO clarified that registering a modified vehicle, especially a heavily-modified one, does not automatically mean an exemption from a ticket in the future.

The confusion mounts when the various groups questioned the LTO on registering the change rim size. Their answer? It may (and may is the operative word here) make the vehicle exempt from apprehension. The same goes for LED spot lights and light bars which for now, the LTO wants covered.

So where does this all lead? No where it seems. Apparently, the dialogue meant to clear the air between the off-roading groups, aftermarket industry, and the LTO simply resulted in more questions than answers.

In fact, Atty. Consunji likened the LTO’s drive against modified vehicles as “tilting at windmills.” For those unfamiliar, it’s derived from the classic novel Don Quixote which Wikipedia describes as:
Confrontations where adversaries are incorrectly perceived, or courses of action that are based on misinterpreted or misapplied heroic, romantic, or idealistic justifications. It may also connote an importune, unfounded, and vain effort against adversaries real or imagined for a vain goal.
In the end, everything remains in status quo and the LTO may continue its crackdown on modified vehicles on the grounds of safety despite what everyone says otherwise; well, that is until they come up with a more technical framework or change the Department Order altogether.

13 comments:

  1. how about changed rimfrom 17 to 16?

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    1. No one will ever probably notice that unless you placed 285/75R16 M/T tires and lifted your vehicle around 4" in order to avoid any rubbing. It's relatively easy to spot especially if the LTO guys are motivated by cash.

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  2. Plain stupid. If you have to talk about safety and modification.
    None of the jeepneys and tricycles should be left on the streets.
    Another money making excuse and hindrance of advancement.
    Fu&%ing fabricated jeepney and tricycle are allowed?
    But hundreds of thousands in enhancements and upgrades to better the performance of cars and suv are illegal? F$#@ing joke

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    1. oh so true man... the only reason they are insisting on this is for monetary reasons..I'm sure they're all aware of this even before they implemented said rule/law/crap whatever, and there will be questions and more. But, it wont matter. Their aim is to get more moolah. I mean come one guys they know it cost money to upgrade and mod vehicles so modders = more money.

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  3. Another MILKING COW from RICH & LEGIT TAX PAYERS people.

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  4. The government is stupid ever since, double standard ever since

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  5. Elections are nearing, if you know what i mean.

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  6. Most countries form their policies with statistics (or data) behind them making their policies objective. It seems that here, it is just subjective... "It looks dangerous!" Where is the data that confirms that they are dangerous? It's just very backward.

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  7. OT, ano ba naman tong pop out ad nyo???
    ? di pa matangal!!!!

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  8. It would seem that beneath the seemingly conciliatory words of Secy. Art Tugade, the operative word is SAFETY - as determined by the car manufacturer. Taking it from there, LTO will recognize a mod as safe if your rig has a certification from the OEM that the mods are approved. To take it further, each time one changes rims, tires, springs and shocks that are not OEM in dimension, one needs a safety certification for such. Question is, will the car maker oblige? They may ask whom are we obliging? They are always looking at it from a lawsuit angle - so if they certify that your wheel upsize is sound and safe - the moment you get into an accident - whatever the reason - plaintiff can now sue the car maker for damages. LTO wants to make it look simple - get a manufacturer certificate - but that is not as simple as it says.

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  9. shoutout sa mga jeep at bus na kalbo ang gulong at walang seatbelt na nirerehistro ng lto as roadworthy. lmao galing talaga ng gobyerno natin

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  10. Would that mean that I wont be allowed to plus size my wheel say for example moving from 18" to 19" rims for passenger cars? Or would I be allowed provided I go back to LTO and register for change of rim size?

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  11. hi how about full car wrapping? anyone has experience in registering car wrapped vehicles? thanks

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