Wednesday, October 17, 2018

LTO Just Made Modifying Your Vehicle a Lot Harder


The LTO, various off-road clubs, and 4x4 enthusiasts held a dialogue to flesh out what the government agency calls the “arbitrary and subjectively apprehending of modified vehicles.” To this end, the LTO clarifies that they are not arbitrarily and subjectively apprehending owners of modified vehicles. However, this will not stop them from implementing an existing law.

In a statement, the LTO says that the law in question is Department Order No. 2010-32 dated September 8, 2010 which is entitled, “Harmonization of Motor Vehicle (MV) Classifications of LTO and LTFRB.”

We discussed this in detail before (and you can even get a full copy of the said Department Order and its annexes), but here’s the gist: the DOTr is aligning itself with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN-ECE), the standard which is being adopted by our ASEAN neighbors as well.

The UN-ECE set out certain parameters on vehicle design and classification to promote road safety and environmental compliance. It includes the proper mounting of headlights and auxiliary lights, the proper construction and height of bumpers, and more.

Therefore, the LTO is going back to Section 5 Number 2 of Department Order No. 2010-32 that outlines what are allowed and not allowed under this Department Order:
“The modifications involving safety and environment shall not be allowed, such as the following: 
  • Axle modification
  • Chassis modification
  • Extended chassis/body
  • Additional siding of dump trucks
  • Extended overhang
  • Change of rim size
  • Modification of handle bar and muffler
  • Reconfiguration of body dimension and design”
The LTO then clarifies that “modification” or what they term as “physical change in the existing motor vehicle design,” is allowed provided a Certificate of Road Safety from the manufacturer can be presented by the owner, to prove that the modification will not compromise, in any way, safety. The same is also subject to inspection by the LTO for possible reclassification.

Oddly enough, the LTO in its statement says that “tampering with the engine performance, drivetrain, suspension, wheels, and brakes of a vehicle, which are outside the approved parameters or its basic components, may affect its performance, and may compromise safety” is also not allowed. This is an addendum to the DOTr’s very own Department Order which only states: “The modifications of the brake system, steering wheel assembly, air conditioning system, suspension and interior and exterior trimmings shall not be constructed as a change in vehicle type classification.” It is silent on whether these are allowed or not on the grounds of road safety and the environment.

The LTO goes on saying that they are apprehending all types of violators and not just owners of modified vehicles. In fact, they clarified that only one modified vehicle has been impounded but that’s on grounds that it isn’t registered.

Of course, that still leaves one question unanswered.

You can read the full LTO statement below:

DOTr, LTO Press Statement
On the alleged arbitrary apprehension of owners of modified vehicles


The Land Transportation Office (LTO) is NOT arbitrarily and subjectively apprehending owners of modified vehicles.

However, the LTO must implement the existing law.

Modification of a motor vehicle was defined by Department Order No. 2010-32 dated 08 September 2010 with subject: Harmonization of Motor Vehicle (MV) Classifications of LTO and LTFRB.

The DO is aligned with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN-ECE), the standard followed by other ASEAN countries.

Section 5, Number 5.2 of the Order states: “The modifications involving safety and environment shall not be allowed, such as the following: Axle modification; Chassis modification; Extended chassis/body; Additional siding of dump trucks; Extended overhang; Change of rim size; Modification of handle bar and muffler; and Reconfiguration of body dimension and design.”

Modification, or physical change in the existing motor vehicle design, is allowed provided a Certificate of Road Safety from the manufacturer can be presented by the owner, to prove that the modification will not compromise, in any way, safety. The same is also subject to inspection by the LTO for possible reclassification.

Please note that tampering with the engine performance, drivetrain, suspension, wheels, and brakes of a vehicle, which are outside the approved parameters or its basic components, may affect its performance, and may compromise safety.

On the other hand, enhancements to features and performance such as interior and exterior trimmings are allowed, for as long as the existing design of the vehicle is not compromised.

The Department of Trade and Industry likewise came up with Philippine National Standards (PNS) to cover locally rebuilt vehicles such as jeepneys.

The assumption that the LTO is focusing its resources on apprehending owners of modified vehicles is not fair. The Law Enforcement Unit of the LTO is out there on the road every day, apprehending ALL types of violators.

As a matter of fact, only one modified vehicle has been impounded in the most recent operation held in NLEX, and the reason for it is because the vehicle is not currently registered.

The DOTr-LTO appreciates the ongoing discussion on this matter, most prominently on social media. In the spirit of transparency and good governance, our doors are open for a dialogue where recommendations and suggestions may be presented and discussed, putting on topmost priority the safety and welfare of the public.

6 comments:

  1. No more slammed vehicles and camber idiots on the road.

    ReplyDelete
  2. ang sabihin nyo corrupt lang tlga ang LTO, which is not shocking and nghahanap tlga ng mpeperahan. lapit na pasko at election, wla na cgro mhanap na paraan para mka pera kaya ganun! that's the known reality ng LTO. Sabi nga ni atty. gadon, bwal ang bobo! LTO is bobo!

    ReplyDelete
  3. isn't the blinking brake lights also a modification. and a very annoying one at that, wherein there is also an existing law for it but even law enforcement has blinking brake lights not related to the actual siren and blinkers.

    ReplyDelete
  4. mufflers... i do understand that but sana small modification of exhaust is not considered as a law violation...

    ReplyDelete
  5. so do i have to buy high end cars to be exempted?

    ReplyDelete

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