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December 5, 2023

Let Toyota Remind You That Its Hybrid Line-Up's Fuel Efficiency Is Hard To Beat


In the past, Toyota Motor Philippines has never been the one to tout or embrace fuel efficiency figures. However, as they face some new competition in the hybrid space, they would like to remind everyone that when it comes to fuel economy, their Toyota Hybrid System or THS is hard to beat.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise since Toyota’s been making gasoline-electric hybrid engines since the world debut of the Prius in 1997. Formerly known as Hybrid Synergy Drive, Toyota has since incorporated the technology whether as standard or as an option in most of their vehicles from the Yaris Cross all the way to the Alphard, locally at least.

Unlike most other hybrid systems, what sets the THS apart is that it’s a series-parallel hybrid. This means that it can run the combustion engine, the electric motor, and/or a combination of the two to deliver the most optimal fuel efficiency in any given scenario. When the engine’s running, the onboard battery is charged via the generator; when driving conditions allow it, such as in slow moving traffic, the generator can cut out the combustion engine and let the electric motor take over. It can even switch off both power sources, relying instead on regenerative braking to turn the electric motor into a power generator. The secret sauce is the sophisticated engine management system which Toyota has tweaked and tuned after selling more than 20 million hybrids.

Now, all this sounds complicated, but the best part of the Toyota Hybrid System is that it’s quite approachable even to a newbie. There’s no worry about maintenance cost too since Toyota hybrids have the same preventive maintenance cost as a conventional gas-powered one. And, even if the high-voltage battery it designed to last the life of the car, it does come with an 8-year warranty for that extra peace of mind.

For the Philippine market, the Toyota Hybrid family starts off with the Yaris Cross. The electrified 1.5-liter (2NR-VEX) pairs a 91 horsepower, 121 Nm gasoline engine with a powerful 80 horsepower, 141 Nm electric motor. Combined, it delivers a total system output of 111 horsepower. This setup, according to Toyota delivers 33.3 km/L in the city, 25.64 km/L on the highway, and 27.78 km/L combined.

From there, it moves up to the Corolla Altis and Corolla Cross and its 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine (2ZR-FXE). This powerplant produces 98 horsepower and 142 Nm from its Atkinson-cycle engine and a further 72 horsepower and 163 Nm from its electric motor. In total, it makes 122 horsepower. This helps the Corolla Altis sedan to do 24.4 km/L in the city, 22.2 km/L on the highway, and a combined 22.7 km/L. Meanwhile, opting for the crossover body puts the figures to 25.6 km/L in the city, 21.7 km/L on the highway, and 23.3 km/L combined.

Then, there’s the (Innova) Zenix Hybrid. Here, the 152 horsepower, 187 Nm Dynamic Force (M20A-FXS) 2.0-liter mates with a 113 horsepower, 206 Nm electric motor giving a combined output of 186 horsepower. With 60 percent of driving done using electric power alone, it equates to a 50 percent improvement in both fuel mileage and CO2 emissions compared to the current Innova and it shows in its figures: 27.8 km/L in the city, 20 km/L on the highway, and 21.7 km/L combined.

For those who want a bit more power to go along with their fuel economy, the trio of the RAV4, Camry, and Alphard does just that. All get the same powertrain: a 2.5-liter Dynamic Force (A25A-FXS). The gasoline engine alone already makes 178 horsepower and 221 Nm in the RAV4 and Camry, and 188 horsepower and 233 Nm in the Alphard. But thanks to a supplemental electric motor (120 horsepower in both the RAV4 and Camry, and 182 horsepower in the Alphard), combined output rises to 211 horsepower in the Camry, 218 horsepower in the RAV4, and 250 horsepower in the Alphard. Efficiency figures? 20.4 km/L in the city, 23.3 km/L on the highway, and 22.7 km/L combined for the Camry; 20.8 km/L in the city, 21.3 km/L on the highway, and 21.3 km/L combined for the RAV4; and 17.5 km/L in the city, 18.9 km/L on the highway, and 18.2 km/L combined for the Alphard.

Take note that these fuel efficiency figures are based on tests done in a controlled environment using internationally accepted fuel consumption test protocols (UN Regulations No. 101). So, the actual fuel mileage varies depending on the traffic situation, driving habits, and even vehicle condition.

Now, if you’re curious as to how the Toyota hybrids performed during our very own fuel efficiency tests, you can check out the links below or try it out for yourself at the Go Electrified with Toyota event at the Bonifacio Highstreet Amphitheater in Bonifacio Global City from December 8 to 10.

28 comments:

  1. Too bad you need to wait 3 to 4 months in order to get and drive a unit aside from paying above the MSRP price tags.
    Affordable Chinese EVs and Hybrids are good alternatives for those who can't wait and want newer tech.

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    Replies
    1. Newer tech is possibly lower ranked in terms of reliability

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  2. When will Toyota Motor Philippines bring in the bZ4X SUV?

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  3. Let me remind Toyota that electric Chinese cars are the future.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For now...but in 3 - 5 years it will be a different story.

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    2. its TESLA....just a reminder

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    3. Tesla source their EV batteries from BYD- a chinese car manufacturer. In case you dont know.

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    4. Tesla batteries from panasonic, byd EV parts they sourced it from tesla supplier. Byd parts supplier used to be unreliable, if tesla didnot put up giga factory in shanghai and trained parts supplier - byd till now would be a piece of junk

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  4. I wonder if we'll ever get M20A powered Corollas.

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  5. Let me remind Toyota that they are overpriced & underspecced

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    Replies
    1. 🤣🤣🤣Definitely no one believes in your reminder, see the ph car sales figures posted here monthly

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    2. Rather than GAC which overpsecs car but falls apart after the warranty ends

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  6. Evs from America like Tesla or Rivian. Not Evs from China. That is why the model y is the best selling ev in the world not a Chinese ev.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, tesla leading on EV's, past, present and definitely in the future. Tesla's highly automated GIGA manufacturing facilities around the world can produced an EV vehicles every 40 seconds. Tesla will lead even into the moon, mars and beyond...

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  7. I dont think anybody is questioning that. The problem with toyota ph is their outdated and overpriced global models. But since majority of their sales are from the rebranded daihatsu models, they do not care about bringing the “real ones”.

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  8. Sadly the article fails to point out that Toyota only make the hybrid version available on premium models, and charge far more for the hybrid variant than the same technology is charged for in other markets. The corporate conduct is about making profits. It is not about making hybrid technology affordable for the Philippine market. Make sure you check other brands and products in the market.

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    Replies
    1. This would not be applicable anymore when Toyota hybridizes more and more of their lineup. Just like with the Camry.

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  9. Yaris cross hybrid, corolla cross hybrid, vs haval hybrids almost same priced. in toyota hybrid you can be sure of reliabilty, durability, lots if dealerships for ease of maintenance and toyota hybrids more prestigous than any china made hybrid

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    Replies
    1. Just wait till your EV battery dies. Its cost to replace is more than the car itself. I dont see any prestige in that.

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    2. Do a research on TOYOTA HYBRID BATTERY man, just google it, and then say that again.

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    3. From what i remember, toyota ceo koji sato announced recently that toyota is done with hybrids and EVs. EVs are not environmental friendly..
      Its hydrogen fuel they are now embarking.

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  10. According to jalopnik, hybrids and EVs lose 50% of their value at the 3rd year of ownership. Its very hard to re sell a 5 year old hybrid, as the battery already wears out mid cycle. Nothing beats a good old ICE engine.
    All the fuel savings you get from hybrids amounts to nothing as that dreaded day comes for you to replace the battery.

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  11. EVs are much better choice now especially the below 1 Million Peso,below 2 Million Peso and below 3 Million Peso Chinese EVs
    Replacing Toyota hybrid batteries are expensive and they easily broke down when the hybrid vehicle is driven at flooded roads as experienced by many Corolla Altis Hybrid and Corolla Cross Hybrid vehicle owners in the Philippines.
    You can't buy 3rd party brand new batteries at Banawe for Toyota vehicles as those batteries by Toyota can't be easily reproduced by other manufacturers.
    Time to move on and go EV!

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    Replies
    1. Hybrids has better survival rate on flooding than EV's. Hybrids can be used everyday, anywhere with out range anxiety just like ICE. EV paikot ikot lang sa subdivision and pag na traffic sa edsa lowbat na dina u makauwi.

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  12. EVs are better for those who plan to keep their ride for long term.

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  13. Save a few pesos on gas now, spend more pesoses for a battery replacement later 😂 not mentioning the fact that hybrid versions are much more expensive than non-hybrid models

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