Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Nissan to Double-Down on Sedans Citing Strong Demand Among Younger Buyers


If you’re young, you don’t want a SUV or crossover; you want a sedan. That’s essentially the findings of a study released by Nissan and also the reason why the Japanese automaker has opted to double down on sedan, despite recent market trends.

In a recent survey done by Edelman Intelligence and commissioned by Nissan found out that among 11,000 respondents from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Thailand, U.A.E., and the U.S.A. who don’t own a sedan, 75 percent would consider buying one now or in the future. That number rises to 8 in 10 (80 percent) for millennials.

Because the segment retains a strong appeal especially for younger buyers, Nissan will continue to double-down on sedans, and will expand its global lineup with all-new models in the near future.

Just this year, Nissan showed off the all-new Sylphy compact sedan and Versa (aka Almera) sub-compact sedan. Later in the year, the carmaker will also introduce the new Skyline which will come with ProPILOT 2.0, the next-generation driver assistance system.

Here is a closer look at sedan drivers today.

Nissan surveyed car owners and non-owners around the world, between the ages of 18 and 65, and found:
  • A top choice: 75 percent of drivers who don’t own a sedan would consider buying one now or in the future.
  • Choice of younger generations: Eight in 10 millennials who don’t own a sedan (80 percent) would consider buying one now or in the future. The same is true for Generation Z: nearly seven in 10 (68 percent) would consider a sedan as their next car.
  • Driven by passionate explorers: Sedan drivers care about more than the daily commute. Seventy-one percent said they’re passionate about travel and adventure, and 62 percent said their passions lie in exploring nature and the outdoors.
  • Adored by owners: Forty-two percent of sedan drivers believe their car has its own personality. More than a quarter (31 percent) admitted talking to their car or even naming it (31 percent).

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