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Friday, May 21, 2021

Subaru's Newest Offering Can Outrun Any Supercar


Subaru’s newest offering can outrun any supercar out there, and that’s why it’s the new vehicle of choice by Japan’s National Police Agency.

The Subaru Bell 412EPX is a helicopter jointly-developed by Subaru and Bell. The 412EPX is an enhancement of the Bell 412 EPI in support of Japan’s UH-X (Utility Helicopter) program.

In 2015, Bell’s long-term partner, Subaru was awarded the contract for the Japan UH-X program to replace Japan Ground Self Defense Force’s (JGSDF) current fleet of helicopters with a militarized derivative of the Subaru Bell 412EPX.

The Subaru Bell 412EPX is a multi-purpose helicopter made by Subaru’s Aerospace division in Utsunomiya, Japan. It can seat 14 people plus a pilot, and has a maximum range of 669 kilometers (361 nautical miles). Enhanced from the Bell 412 EPI, the 412EPX has a more robust main rotor gearbox and increased mast torque output. As such, it can transport up to 2,805 kilograms of load while still traveling at 228 km/h for close to four hours.


A civilian version of the Subaru Bell 412EPX will be made available to global customers in the near future.

If Subaru making helicopters may sound like a surprise, it you need a bit of a history lesson.

Subaru, formerly known as Fuji Heavy Industries traces its roots to the Nakajima Aircraft Company, a leading supplier of airplanes to the Japanese government in World War II. After the war, the company was split up. In 1953, together with five other Japanese companies, it merged forming one of Japan’s largest manufacturers of transport equipment (hence Subaru’s six-star logo).


Aside from selling cars, Subaru’s aerospace division markets and sells Bell and Boeing helicopters. It also provides parts for the Boeing 777 and 787 Dreamliner. The Subaru Bell 412EPX is the first helicopter made by the company.

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